Tips For Building in Remote Locations
Tips For Building in Remote Locations
All of the considerations for transportation, material, access to utilities, and good design should be considered. Often future home owners buy lots only to discover that because of any of the above issues, or other restrictions that are imposed by ministry or townships, are not able to construct what they planned to build or even build anyhow. A well-designed site will have ease of access, great topography, and water accessibility, as well as potential for utilities. The location of the land (also known as topography) often is a major factor in building design. It is important to not acquire a large amount of land in low-lying areas as the soil tends to be unstable, and future flooding could damage your home. Take into consideration the access to water, if it is accessible, is it public as well as privately-owned. Are there any costs for the use of this access, and is it large enough to meet the needs of a barge, which could be used or not be able to use for transporting materials. Can the access be navigated. For instance an area with many floating logs cannot be accessible by float plane. The utility implications of weeping systems such as water supply, electric generation units should be considered. Fresh water supply First and most important is having access to fresh drinking water, or what builders refer to as "potable water". 1. Unless heavy trucks and equipment can make it into your property, the chances of drilling a well are extremely limited. However, there is a small core drill machine accessible, that's portable and can drill 2" wide well. One disadvantage to this kind of well is the Taiwan Auto Parts limitation of pumps to transport the water to the surface. They are typically limited to a water table depth of around fifty feet. If you add storage "head" of 20 feet, then the well must be in the water table at a minimum of thirty feet or less from the surface. 2. Another alternative can be a dug-well. This type of well typically has a lower water quality however, it is far easier to construct in difficult areas. It's essentially a hole that is dug up to four feet below the water level to allow for storage of water that is sufficient. 3. The third option is if you live close to a stream or lake, you could use the water directly from its source. There is also the issue of water quality which could necessitate the installation of filtration equipment or water treatment systems. An advantage of a stream is that you can install an electric ram pump that can be in a position to push water to higher levels. This type of pump requires regular maintenance, and a good constant flow of water in order to be effective. 4. If you're fortunate, you may be blessed with a spring or an artesian water well. These are reliable and reliable sources of clean drinking water. In any case you should consider whether or not you'll be utilizing a pumped pressure system or gravity fed system. If there is a spring, artisan well or other water source is found on land above your house and is accessible, a gravity system can potentially eliminate the need to use any mechanical pumps requiring an outside energy source, at all. Most often, construction companies choose to go with gravity systems. This includes a large storage tank which is situated approximately 15' over the highest plumbing outlet. They usually set up the installation in which the system will fill itself up from gravity water sources or pumped only occasionally to fill up the storage tank. This is the least expensive option that provides extremely satisfactory results. Sewers and waste systems Waste disposal like dishwater, showers or toilets must be done in accordance with codes and laws. It may be necessary to install of a septic system or other certified waste handling equipment. You could also build an outhouse. But the choice is yours. In the construction industry , there are two types of waste. Grey water is derived from bath or dishwater shower water, as well as sump pumps and sanitary waste, which comes primarily from toilets. 1. If you like the comforts of your home it is worth installing the septic system. This kind of system is by far the most costly. The weeping bed must be constructed in accordance to environmental regulations that require the import of special gravel and/or filter sand. Plastic tanks are available on the marketthat can be transported, even to remote sites, or you can construct a tank, but it will require a professional design. The advantage is an independent, reliable system, requiring little maintenance, which should continue to function for the entire life of the building , and will handle both sanitary and grey water waste. Secondary systems include the use of outhouses, as well as biological or chemical toilets, combined with a grey water filter or septic. Grey water systems can be cleaned by means of mechanically or an array of weeping pipe that are laid beneath the ground (consult the local Ministry of Environment concerning the particular regulations to follow). 2. If you are comfortable with an outhouseand are considering an additional grey water system, this is the best option to take. Outhouses can be attractive and smell-free, but without additional heat, they can be very cold in the mornings, especially during the winter months. 3. Chemical or biological toilets are used to handle waste equipment , and they must meet certain environmental and safety guidelines before they are put on the market. They are a relatively cheap option for an indoor toilet, and many assure that they are completely odorless (which is what has actually proven to me). Some require the use of electrical motors and fan, and some are energy-free mechanical. They are simple to set up and are relatively maintenance-free with only a few seasonal maintenance. 4. Grey water systems, when paired together with bio toilets and outhouses, are generally thought to be the most popular systems of choice. Grey water systems are generally a series of weeping pipes, lain amidst the gravel bed. They connect to the building through a distribution box. Never in any way, connect a toilet to such systems because they're designed for free water and solids can block up the pipes. The grey-water weeping system have no maintenance and will require minimal cost and time to install. Of the three, I'd suggest the installation of a toilet with a biological system and gray water systems. It combines indoor convenience at a lower cost and can be a great option in the future years. Electricity Of all the modern conveniences we can enjoy, they all require the use of electricity. Electricity plays a significant function in our current lifestyle which is why we are compelled to incorporate it in almost all of our building projects. We often overlook the fact that electricity powers our fans, pumps lights, lighting devices, entertainment systems and other mechanical devices, which operate in silence in our homes. In buildings with isolation they are used to power lighting, pumps and fans, necessary for the operation of the mechanical systems of the building, as well being able for radios, televisions computer systems, heating pads and kitchen appliances, among other comforts, not necessarily thought to be part of the building's needs for resources. There are a variety of ways for obtaining power, which include fuel-powered generators that produce active power, as well as solar or wind powered generators for passive power. Active power is exactly that power that is available to you, at your own convenience, as you supply your fuel sources. Passive power is only available in the event that certain conditions, specific to the type of generator utilized are satisfied (i.e. solar collectors work only on clear days). Passive power is primarily delivered as 12-volts and although expensive, there are many products including appliances, mechanical equipment and other items available to use this type of power supply. Also there are converters that will convert the 12-volt to 120 volt, thereby allowing use of normal household items and mechanical devices. In addition it is important to note that passive systems do not offer continuous as they do not supply the massive amount of electricity produced from fuel fired generators. With passive supply, owners should be aware of and track their power consumption, so that they have enough power to run any necessary mechanicals for example, furnace fans and water pump.  

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